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Full text of "Cotton values in textile fabrics"

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COTTON VALUES 



IN- 



TEXTILE FABRICS. 

A Collection of Cloth Samples, Arranged to Show 

the Value of Cotton, When Converted 

Into Various Kinds of Cloth. 



/ 

By 1). A. TOMPKINS. 

Author of Cotton Mill Processes and Calculations 

Cotton Mill, Commercial Features ; American 

Commerce, Its Expansion. 



CHARLOTTE. N. C. 

Publistied by ttie Auittior. 

igoo. 



1 



'rWO COPIES RECEiVa. 

APR M 1900 

negister ef Copy plgjif^, 







57942 

Copyright, 1900, 

by 

D. A. TOMPKINS. 



0" 



^ 



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SECOND COPY. 



OBSERVER PRINT. CHARLOTTE, N. O 






preface. 

This collection of samples of cotton goods 
with data on costs per yard and per pound, 
was prepared to show the possibilities that 
lie in our cotton crop, 

Oppositie each sample is shown the value 
of a good North Carolina crop, 500,000 
bales, reckoned as raw material, and sold at 
a normal average price of six cents per pound 
or thirty dollars per bale. 

Contrasted with this valuation, is shown 
what the same half million bales would 
bring if manufactured into goods like the 
samples, at normal average prices. 

The cheapest sample shown is duck, worth 
fourteen cents per pound. Half a million 
bales of cotton in this shape would bring 
thirty-five million dollars, or nearly two and 
a half times its value in the raw state. The 
whole crop of the country, say eleven mil- 
lion bales, if manufactured into this goods 
and sold at this price, would show a gain 
over the raw price of over four hundred 
million dollars, or over five dollars per capita 



for all the people of the Continental United 
States, 

To manufacture the entire cotton crop into 
duck would be a misfortune somewhat akin 
to selling the entire crop in its raw state. 
But cotton may be made into numerous other 
forms to produce even greater values, as is 
shown by the succeeding samples ; the last of 
which shows that if the North Carolina crop 
could be converted into Swiss embroidery 
and sold at twenty dollars per pound, it 
would bring five billion dollars. This is 
about equal to all the money received for all 
the raw cotton grown in the United States 
in the past twenty years. It is more than 
enough to buy all the cotton and woolen 
mills in the world ! 

To manufacture the entire crop of the 
country into embroidery would be as unde- 
sirable as to turn it all into duck. These 
extreme figures are given to show the wide 
range of possibilities in the business. They 
exhibit the relative gain in both cases and 
not the absolute result to be attained. 

All of the samples shown are made of 



cotton ; but some of the finest were not made 
of the ordinary cotton of our commerce, and 
therefore it may be contended that the claim 
for such princely values in our cotton is 
beyond the mark. But the goods were made 
of a kind of cotton. This cotton was grown 
under certain conditions. If these conditions 
were well understood, and the production of 
cotton carried on with sufficient skill, these 
fine grades of cotton could be raised over 
large areas now devoted to the ordinary 
kind. 

Therefore the argument resolves itself into 
a question of proper education and thrift, to 
turn a possible cotton crop into thousands of 
t^mes the money now realized on it by the 
people who produce it. In other words, in 
undertaking to exhibit the values to which 
cotton may be brought, the subject covers 
improvement of the lint by the grower, as 
well as improvement in spinning and weav- 
ing by the manufacturer. 

Part of the difference between the price of 
raw cotton and the retail prices affixed to the 
samples shown, is created by the merchant, 



V 



and not all by the manufacturer. But never- 
theless there is a gain to the community by 
reason of the goods having been manufac- 
tured at home. The very process of manu- 
facturing is conducive to greater volume of 
mercantile business, from the fact that many 
people are thus given employment, who 
would otherwise be idle. These people 
become wealth producers, and become much 
larger consumers of all commodities than 
before. 

The grower of unimproved raw cotton now 
receives but a modicum of its possible value. 
It is hoped that this collection of samples, 
though giving but a minute suggestion of 
the infinite possibilities, may point the way 
to greater returns for the labor of the people 
in the cotton growing States, and lead them 
to finding out the steps necessary to acquire 
the skill for producing better qualities of cot- 
ton, and for turning this better cotton into 
goods of greater values. 

D. A. TOMPKINS. 

Charlotte, N. C, March 31, 1900. 



VALUE OF A NORTH CAROLINA COTTON CROP 
OF 500,000 BALES. 

IF MANUFACTURED. 



AS COTTON @ 6 CENTS 
PER POUND. 

115,000,000. 
|i5,ooo coo. 
$15,000,000. 
|i5,ooo,ooo. 
|i 5, 000, 000. 
$15,000,000. 
$15,000,000. 
$15,000,000. 
$15,000,000. 
$15,000,000. 
$15,000,000. 
$15,000,000. 
$15,000,000. 
$15,000,000. 
$15,000,000. 
$15,000,000. 
$15,000,000. 
$15,000,000. 



1 Duck @ 14c per lb 

2 Drilling @ 16 

3 Sheeting @ 18 

4 Bleaching @ 20 

5 Tick @ 24 

6 Cheviot @ 26 

7 Denim @ 30 

8 Plain Gingham @ 



34 



$35,000,000 
$40,000,000 
$45,000,000 
$50,000,000 
$60,000,000 
$65,000,000 
$75,000,000 
$85 000,000 



9 Window Shade Cloth @ 34 $85,000,000 



10 Madras @ 40 

11 Long Cloth @ 70 

12 Mercerized Cloth @ $1 

13 Fancy Gingham @ $1 60 

14 Poplin @ $1.80 

15 Emb Gingham @ $2.20 

16 Fancy Gingham @ $2.80 

17 Persian Lawn @ $4.00 

18 Embroidery @ $20.00 



$100,000,000' 

$175,000,000 

$250,000,000 

$400,000,000 

$450,000,000 

$550,000,000 

) $700,000,000 

$1,000,000,000 

$5,000,000,000 



TEN OUNCE DUCK. 

Made in North Carolina. 



Price Per Yard, ^ ^ / 8|c. 

Price Per Pound, ^ /- >* 14 c« 



Value of 500,000 Bales of Cotton 
Produced in North Carolina, 



In Bales, as Usually Sold, 

@ 6c ^ " " $15,000,000- 



In Duck, Like Sample, 

@ 14c, ^ " $35,000,000. 



THREE YARD DRILL 

Made in North Carolina. 



Price Per Yard, ^ ^ - 5^. 
Price per Pound, »* «> ^ 16c, 



Value of 500,000 Bales of Cotton 
Produced in North Carolina. 



In Bales, as Usually Sold, 

(cv: 6c ^ <- / $15,000,000. 



In Three Yard Drill, Like Sample, 

ia 16c ^ - ^ $40,000,000. 



FOUR YARD SHEETING. 

Made in North Carolina. 



Price Per Yard, ^ ^ ^ 4^c. 

Price Per Pound, >t t* i> 18c, 



Value of 500,000 Bales of Cotton 
Produced in North Carolina. 



In Bales, as Usually Sold, 

{a 6c ^ ^ /* $15,000,000. 



In Four Yard Sheeting, Like Sample, 

(« 18c, ^ ^ $45,000,000. 



I 



BLEACHING. 

Made in North Carolina, 



Price Per Yard, ^ ^ ^ 7c, 

Price per Pound, f> ^ ^ 20c. 



Value of 500,000 Bales of Cotton 
Produced in North Carolina. 



In Bales, as Usually Sold, 

('9 6c ^ / ^ $15,000,000. 



In Bleaching, Like Sample, 

r«; 20c <- - ^ $50,000,000. 



.h 



SATIN STRIPE TICK. 

Made in North Carolina. 



Price Per Yard, ,» t* » 12c. 

Price Per Pound, i* i* f 24c. 



Value of 500,000 Bales of Cotton 
Produced in North Carolina. 



In Bales, as Usually Sold, 

^< 6c ^ ^ / $15,000,000. 



In Satin Stripe Tick, Like Sample, 

r« 24c, ^ ^ $60,000,000. 



NORWOOD CHEVIOT. 

Made in North Carolina. 



Price Per Yard, ^ ^ ^ 8c. 

Price per Pound, / ,> ,* 26c. 



Value of 500,000 Bales of Cotton 
Produced in North Carolina. 



In Bales, as Usually Sold, 

(9 6c ^ ^ ^ $15,000,000 



In Norwood Cheviot, Like Sample, 

(« 26c ^ - ^ $65,000,000. 



SIX OUNCE DENIM. 

Made in North Carolina. 



Price Per Yard, ^ ^ -^ 12c. 

Price Per Pound, ^ ^ .^ 30c. 



Value of 500,000 Bales of Cotton 
Produced in North Carolina. 



In Bales, as Usually Sold, 

(a, 6c ^ ^ ^ $15,000,000. 



In Six Ounce Denim, Like Sample, 

(« 30c, ^ ^ $75,000,000. 



GINGHAIVI. 

Made in North Carolina. 



Price Per Yard, . ^ . 5c, 

Price per Pound, >> '' >> 34c. 



Value of 500,000 Bales of Cotton 
Produced in North Carolina. 



In Bales, as Usually Sold, 

(«^ 6c ^ ^ ^ $15,000,000 



In Gingham, Like Sample, 

(a 34c ^ - ^ $85,000,000. 



SHADE CLOTH. 

Made in North Carolina. 



Price Per Yard, ^ ^ ^ 5c. 

Price per Pound, ^ ^ ^ 34c 



Value of 500,000 Bales of Cotton 
Produced in North Carolina. 



In Bales, as Usually Sold, 

(a 6c ^ ^ ^ $15,000,000. 



In Window Shade Cloth, Like Sample, 

(^ 34c, ^ ^ - $85,000,000, 



IVIADRAS. 

Made in North Carolina. 



Price Per Yard, ^ i* >> 7z, 

Price Per Pound, '' ** *> 40c, 



Value of 500,000 Bales of Cotton 
Produced in North Carolina. 



In Bales, as Usually Sold, 

@ 6c ^ ^ ^ $15,000,000. 



In Madras, Like Sample, 

(« 40c, .' ^ $100,000,000. 



LONG CLOTH. 

Made in England. 



Price Per Yard, a* '^ /14 c, 

Price Per Pound, ^ ^ /* 70c, 



* Value of 500,000 Bales of Cotton 

J 

Produced in North Carolina, 



In Bales, as Usually Sold, 

@ 6c / / / $15,000,000. 



In Long Cloth, Like Sample, 

@ 70c / - " $175,000,000. 



f 



12 



AWIISILK. 

(Mercerized Cotton.) 

Made in New England. 



Price Per Yard, . . . 35c, 
Price per Pound, ^ ^ ^ $1,00 



Value of 500,000 Bales of Cotton 
Produced in North Carolina. 



In Bales, as Usually Sold, 

(CO 6c ^ / ^ $15,000,000. 



In Amisilk, Like Sample, 

(L^ $100, / ^ - $250,000,000. 



13 

ARTHURIAN LUSTRE. 

Made in New England, 



Price Per Yard, ^ f ,> 30c, 

Price Per Pound, ^ ^ / $1.60, 



Value of 500,000 Bales of Cotton 
Produced in North Carolina, 



In Bales, as Usually Sold, 

@ 6c ^ ^ ^ $15,000,000. 



In Arthurian Lustre, Like Sample, 

@ $1,60 / - ^ $400,000,000, 



14 

POPLIN. 

Made in New England. 



Price Per Yard, ^ >, ^ 68c» 
Price per Pound, / >> ,> $1,80 



Value of 500,000 Bales of Cotton 
Produced in North Carolina. 



In Bales, as Usually Sold, 

@ 6c ^ » » $15,000,000. 



In Poplin, Like Sample 

@ $1.80, / ^ . $450,000,000. 



15 

FANCY GINGHAM 

Made in North Carolina. 



Price Per Yard, - - - 36^- 
Price per Pound, ^ ^ / $2,20 



Value of 500,000 Bales of Cotton 
Produced in North Carolina. 



In Bales, as Usually Sold, 

(« 6c ^ ^ ^ $15,000,000. 



In Fancy Gingham, Like Sample, 

(w 36ic, » ^ - $550,000,000. 



,, , :t 




i6 

FANCY GINGHAM 

Made in North Carolina. 



Price Per Yard, ^ ^ ^ 47c. 

Price per Pound, -^ '' '' $2,80 



Value of 500,000 Bales of Cotton 
Produced in North Carolina. 



In Bales, as Usually Sold, 

<S 6c ^ ^ ^ $15,000,000. 



In Fancy Gingham, Like Sample, 

@ 47c, ^ ^ - $700,000,000. 



PERSIAN LAWN. 

Made in Germany, 



Price Per Yard, ^ f /'25c. 

Price Per Pound, ^ >> ^ $4,00, 



Value of 500,000 Bales of Cotton 
Produced in North Carolina, 



In Bales, as Usually Sold, 

ict ^c " " " $15,000,000 



In Persian Lawn, Like Sample, 

(«; $4.00 ^ - $1,000,000,000. 



i8 

EMBROIDERY. 

Made in Switzerland 



Price Per Yard, ^ ^ ^ 30c. 

Price Per Pound, / ^ » $20.00. 



Value of 500,000 Bales of Cotton 
Produced in North Carolina, 



In Bales, as Usually Sold, 

(" 6c ^ ^ ^ $15,000,000, 



In Embroidery, Like Sample, 

(<' S20.00 / - $5,000,000,000. 




'k ^Mi^^S^ fMf ^^- 



fS 







BY THE SAME AUTHOR. 



Cotton Mill Processes and Calculations. 

A complete hand book for the Superintendent and Over- 
seer. A text book for textile schools. Finely illustrated with 
original drawings. 

Price J^5 oo 



Cotton Mill, Commercial Features. 

A complete description of the method of organizing new 
cotton mill companies Discussion of kind of goods to make. 
Tables of costs of mills, and costs of manufacturing various 
goods. Full statistics of cotton manufacturing. 

Price :?5.oo. 



American Commerce, Its Expansion. 

A collection of pamphlets and addresses, relating to the 
subject of enlarged markets for American goods. Also relating 
to the education of young men and women for textile pursuits. 

Price 75 Cents. 



Order from 



D. A. TOMPKINS, 
Charlotte, N. C.